Love Token no. 9

A pendant made using my cat’s hair. 

I love my cat, I love my cat, I love my cat… I remember a song from the 80s(?), and it went: I’m so happy my cat’s not dead. I can relate. I want my cats to live forever, but they don’t ! 

The Victorians, during 1800s in England, fashioned the human hair of their beloved into articles of jewelry. It was a way of having a cherished individual close to the heart.

For cat-aholics, who want a beloved feline presence closely felt, there is the cat hair pendant. I crafted this single, double spiraled orb, using brass and stainless steel wire, then attached it to leather strand. A hand full of Gaia’s hair is all it to took to create this three quarters of an inch orb.


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Keep it Weird—A Hairy Tale

There is attraction and repulsion to the unusual.

In the beginning of June, Etsy had a post on its blog called Keep it Weird: Cat Lady, and “Caged” hair puff necklace was featured. Next came Catsparella (which featured a nice post with pictures), Modern Cat, and Laughing Squid. Then an article in Wired UK, which contributed to the cat hair jewelry phenomenon going viral.

The comments to the jewelry went from one extreme to the other—creepy to awesome.

Some Hair History— hair jewelry was the height of the romanticism and sentiment that characterized the Victorian era. Some pieces were done as mourning pieces or “momento mori”.  While some may find this morbid, for the Victorians death was a common and accepted part of everyday life especially due to the higher infant mortality rate of the time, and the devastation of the Civil War. Hair jewelry was not always mourning jewelry, however, as it was also crafted as love tokens from sweethearts, family members and cherished friends.

It is interesting to note that when hair is on the head, we take pride in it, and the same could be said for hair on an animal, it usually evokes a pleasant experience.                 BUT, once it leaves it roots, aversion can set in and take over.